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Workshop

Third Edition of Summer Workshop on Philology, Paleogrphy and Codicology
The International Studies Institute,
Florence, Palazzo Rucellai
June 2013


In recent years significant changes in university curricula, both in Europe and in the U.S., have made it increasingly difficult for students to receive advanced training in philology, paleography, and codicology. And yet, these subjects are crucial for the study of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance at the graduate and postgraduate level. Consequently, a number of prestigious universities and institutions have decided to take a first step to fill this serious gap.
Starting in 2010,the International Studies Institute, the Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo, the Society for Renaissance Studies, Villa I Tatti (The Harvard Center for Renaissance Studies), The Charles Singleton Center for Italian Studies (Johns Hopkins University), The Dutch Institute for Art History in Florence (Istituto Universitario Olandese di Storia dell’Arte), Georgetown University at Villa Le Balze, and Kent State University Florence Program have joined their efforts to promote: Translating the Past: A Workshop on Medieval and Renaissance Sources devoted to Art, History, and Literature. This initiative has proved a remarkable success. The first two editions have been attended by some thirty students coming from the best-known universities and study centers from all over the world.

Translating the Past will be offered again in summer 2013 at The International Studies Institute (Palazzo Rucellai, Florence, Italy). Throughout June 2013, students will participate in a one-month summer workshop devoted to these disciplines and taught by internationally renowned specialists who are noted for their scholarly contributions and long teaching experience. Students attending the workshop will acquire both a methodological and a practical introduction to the subjects through seminars and hands-on assignments. Furthermore, they will explore the Florentine collections in the famous local libraries and archives, such as the Archivio di Stato, the Biblioteca Nazionale and the Biblioteca Riccardiana. Classes will be held at The International Studies Institute at Palazzo Rucellai. For more information see the attached project and/or email the workshop’s coordinator, Prof. Stefano U. Baldassarri, at sbaldassarri@isiflorence.org.


 

Translating the Past: A Workshop on Medieval and Renaissance Sources devoted to Art, History, and Literature

This program aims to introduce graduate students to the following subjects: philology, codicology, and paleography. Its nature will be primarily practical, as students will be taught to read, describe, and edit Latin and Italian vernacular sources from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (ca. 1200-1600).
Toward this end, seminars will alternate with visits to archives and libraries in Florence. All classes will be taught in English. However, since knowledge of Latin and Italian is a prerequisite to the study of the disciplines mentioned above, students are expected to be able to read printed texts in these languages.

Organizing institutions:

The International Studies Institute at Palazzo Rucellai (ISI Florence)
Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo

In collaboration with:
The Charles Singleton Center for Italian Studies (Johns Hopkins University)
The Dutch Institute for Art History in Florence (Istituto Universitario Olandese di Storia dell’Arte)
Kent State University Florence Program
The Society for Renaissance Studies
Villa I Tatti (The Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies)

Advisory Committee:
Antonio Artese (ISI Florence),
Stefano U. Baldassarri (ISI Florence),
Christopher S. Celenza (The American Academy in Rome),
 Samuel K. Cohn Jr. (University of Glasgow),
James Hankins (Harvard University),
Michael W. Kwakkelstein (Istituto Universitario Olandese di Storia dell’Arte),
John E. Law (University of Wales, Swansea),
Stefano Lorenzetti (Conservatorio di Musica di Vicenza),
Giuseppe Mazzotta (Yale University),
 Massimo Miglio (Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo),
Fabrizio Ricciardelli (Kent State University).
Coordinator: Stefano U. Baldassarri (ISI Florence).

Instructors:
Antonella Ghignoli (Università di Roma “La Sapienza”: Palaeography and Diplomatics), Paul Gwynne (The American University of Rome: Philology),
 David Rundle (University of Oxford: Codicology and Incunabula).

Course description and schedule
A total of 72 hours of class and related activities throughout June 2013 scheduled as follows:

a. Morning: 40 hours (9.00 am - 12.00 pm, Mon.-Thurs. at The International Studies Institute at Palazzo Rucellai) + 12 hours (9.00 am-13.00 pm on Friday three times a month to visit archives and libraries in Florence).

Topics:

  • Paleography and diplomatics
  • Codicology and incunabula
  • Philology

b. Afternoon: 20 hours (3.00 pm-5.00 pm, Mon. -Thurs. at The International Studies Institute at Palazzo Rucellai).

Topics:

  • Palaeography and diplomatics
  • Codicology and incunabula
  • Philology


Further activities: The program will also include a visit to Villa I Tatti (The Harvard Center for Renaissance Studies) and its library. On that occasion, students will be given a talk on web resources for the study of incunabula and sixteenth-century printed editions.

Fees: US$ 4.000,00 (tuition + housing: US$ 750 deposit by April 20, 2013, US$ 3.250 by May 30, 2013).
Housing will be in shared apartments located in downtown Florence specifically selected for the
workshop students.

Application procedure: By March 31, 2013, have the following materials sent by email or by air mail to Prof. Stefano U. Baldassarri, c/o The International Studies Institute, Palazzo Rucellai, Via della Vigna Nuova 18, 50123 Florence, Italy (sbaldassarri@isiflorence.org): CV, list of publications (if any), a onepage statement of purpose, two letters of recommendation by professors who have known you as a student.

Requirements: By the end of the workshop, students will have to submit a short essay on either philology, codicology or paleography previously discussed with the instructors as evidence of the skills they have acquired.
The organizing institutions will furnish all materials necessary to support participating students’ requests for credits from their home universities. Upon completion of the course, students will be awarded a certificate issued by the Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo and The Charles Singleton Center for Italian Studies (Johns Hopkins University).